Back to the Classics Challenge 2018

2018 is just a few weeks away, and I’m excited to say that I’m going to be joining the 2018 Back to the Classics Reading Challenge! You can find all the guidelines, and join the challenge yourself, over on Books and Chocolate. Here are some of the classics I’m planning to read next year (although, knowing me, this list will probably change!) All links go to the book’s Goodreads page.

  • A 19th century classic: Great Expectations by Charles Dickens. I’m always up for another Dickens book! Hoping I’ll be able to find this one on audio, though.
  • A 20th century classic: The Great Gatsby by F. Scot Fitzgerald. This is on my school list for next year, and of course it’s also a really famous classic.
  • A classic by a woman author: Frankenstein by Mary Shelly.  I’m supposed to read this for school next year, and I’m very interested to see what the original story is really like.
  • A classic in translation: The Mysterious Island by Jules Verne (English translation; originally written in French). I’ve been wanting to give this a reread (it’s probably my favorite Verne novels), and I have a nice audiobook version. The real problem will be making time to read it!
  • A children’s classic: A Little Princess by Frances Hodgson Burnett. I read this once, a very, very long time ago, and I think it’s probably about time to read it again.
  • A classic crime story, fiction or non-fiction: Strong Poison by Dorothy L. Sayers. I’ve been reading the Lord Peter Whimsy mysteries recently, and a lot of people seem to think that this is one of the best books in the series. I believe we have an audiobook version, so I’ll probably listen to that.
  • A classic travel or journey narrative, fiction or non-fiction:  The Innocents Abroad by Mark Twain. I hadn’t even heard of this book before this challenge, but it looks to be very humorous and fun, so I hope I shall enjoy it.
  • A classic with a single word title: Christy by Catherine Marshall. Another book that’s on my school list for next year. It looks quite interesting.
  • A classic with a color in the title: The Little White Horse by Elizabeth Goudge. It’s been a while since I read this, and as it’s an old favorite of mine I should probably get around to actually reading it again… 😛
  • A classic by an author that’s new to you: Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte. My mom just got the new audiobook version, and really enjoyed it, so I think I’ll be checking it out as well.
  • A classic that scares you: The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson. I’ve heard that a lot of weirdness goes on in this book, so I suppose I’m rather nervous to actually read it…
  • Re-read a favorite classic: Emily of New Moon by L. M. Montgomery. The Emily series is my favorite L. M. Montgomery series, but I’ve only read the books once! So, I’ll be endeavoring to read them all again for this challenge, or at least read the first book.

I’m super excited to join this challenge! I haven’t been reading as much as I should recently, so hopefully this will get me off to a good start in the new year. Anyway, thanks so much for reading this post! You can follow me over on Goodreads for updates as I read some of these books. Will you be joining the challenge? Don’t forget to check it out over on Books and Chocolate!

See you again soon.

🙂


Back to the Classics Banner

November Monthly Wrap Up

December is upon us, bringing with it more cold, snow, holiday stress, and, most importantly, Christmas! And, it also means that it’s time for another monthly wrap up post here on my blog. Let’s jump in, shall we?

November Monthly Wrap Up


Highlights:

  • The Tangle was published earlier this month, and me and some of my author friends put together an awesome blog tour! I even got to be on my friend Hannah Heath’s YouTube channel for an awesome author interview! You can find the complete list of blog tour stops here.
  • I finally got out of my reading slump! I’ve haven’t been reading anything besides school books for a long time now, but I finally picked up a few things from the library including the Erased Manga series that was recommended by Hannah Heath, although the first book in that hasn’t actually come in at the library yet, so… Can’t actually read the series yet. 😐

Posts from November 2017:


Looking Forward:

Obviously, Christmas is coming up fast (Yay advent season!) and then it will be 2018! I’m working on a novelette set in the world of Behind Her Mask was Death, which I would like to publish on Kindle in late December. Other than that, I don’t have a lot planned. We’ll just have to see what happens!


Thanks for reading my November wrap up! Did you have a good Thanksgiving? Are you excited about Christmas? (I know I am!) Let’s chat in the comments!

🙂

Net Neutrality: What It Is and Why I’m Fighting For It

Today, I sent a letter to my Senator. Well… an email, actually, but that doesn’t sound as exciting or dramatic, so… yeah. Anyway, I sent an email to my Senator today, and I’ll probably send another one tomorrow.


Why?

You might have heard the term ‘net neutrality’ floating around the interwebs recently, and you might not really know what it is. Net neutrality is the idea that no ISP (Internet Service Provider) can censor, slow down, or make you pay extra for access to certain sites. Sounds pretty straight forward, right? Sounds like common sense, even. But there’s a catch. Net neutrality is guaranteed by laws passed in 2015, but those laws could soon be repealed.

The FCC, or the Federal Communications Commission, wants to repeal net neutrality, supposedly so that the government won’t be so involved in regulating the internet. They talk about it like this is a good thing, that free speech will be increased without the government enforcing these net neutrality rules. But that’s not true. With net neutrality repealed, ISPs will be able to actively censor the information and opinions available to consumers, by either blocking undesirable sites, putting them in an internet ‘slow lane’ (drastically increasing the site’s loading time), or hiding them behind a paywall. Freedom of speech will be curtailed. Independent companies, who can’t pay the ISPs to move their sites to the ‘fast lanes’, will die off. Companies could forward political agendas by only allowing access to sites that promote their viewpoint. Indies like myself, who rely on the internet to get word out and make sales, could be out of a job.


What can we do?

There’s still time to fight for net neutrality. The repeal goes up for voting in the FCC on December 14th, and it will probably go through, but Congress can stop this from happening if enough people contact them. You can call your Senators, or if phone calls make you anxious (like me!) you can use ResistBot to send your Senator a letter or email.

Visit Battle for the Net to learn more about net neutrality and call your Senator

Learn more about net neutrality and use ResistBot to send your Senator an email

This issue is extremely important, and I hope that you will take a couple of minutes to learn more about net neutrality and contact your Senator and ask them to stop the repeal. Censorship is never the answer, and the truth is what makes us free, but it can’t if it’s trapped behind a paywall or stuck in the slow lane.


Net Neutrality

Netflix Review: Stranger Things (Seasons 1-2)

Stranger_Things_logoNetflix’s hit original series more than lives up to the hype.


If you’ve been on the internet at all within the last year or so, you’ve definitely heard of Stranger Things, a Netflix original series full of 80s nostalgia, an authentic small-town atmosphere, and complete with just enough government conspiracy theories and paranormal activity to really shake things up. I’d heard of it, of course, but I hadn’t really been interested until I saw the trailer for the second season, which came out around Halloween. I ended up binge watching the entire series after Season 2 came out, and, as you can probably tell from the little tag line at the top of this review, I loved it.

Fair warning: SPOILERS AHEAD!


Season 1: Missing kids and monster hunts.

Season 1 introduces us to three sets of characters, who all work toward similar goals throughout the story and often meet and crossover with one another: the kids, the teenagers, and the adults. The kids are Mike, Dustin, Lucas, and Will, a group of outcast middle-schoolers who love watching Star Wars and playing Dungeons and Dragons. When Will goes missing on his way home from a D&D game with his friends, his mother, Joyce, calls up the local law enforcement, lead by Chief of Police Jim Hopper, to find him. Will’s remaining friends go on the hunt for him themselves, meeting up with a strange, lost girl called Eleven, who has telekinetic powers and knows the one thing everyone else has missed; Will has become stranded in a parallel dimension called the Upside Down. He was taken by a monster called the demigorgon, which is now on the prowl in the small town of Hawkins, looking for new victims. Adults, teens and kids alike must band together to stop this monster, and uncover the sketchy goings-on at the high security government lab situated just too close to the town for comfort.

While Stranger Things is certainly a slower-paced show, the writers always find new ways to kick the suspense up another notch. I came into the show knowing several pretty big spoilers (they’re quite hard to avoid on the internet these days), but the show still surprised me and kept me on the edge of my seat at every turn. It perfectly balanced elements of psychological horror and tense, nail-biting scenes with freaky, in-your-face jumpscares.

The writers also do an expert job of weaving the different threads of the story together into a tightly-knit tapestry, and even though the cast of characters is quite large, all of them are well developed and interesting. Even though the teenagers’ section of the story wasn’t my favorite, it is only fair to say that this is just personal preference, as all the characters were fleshed out and played very well by their respective actors. Maybe I was just a bit disappointed when what I thought was the message of this portion of the story ended up falling flat. The writers seemed to have planted a subtle message about modern hook up culture (a teenage character hooks up with her boyfriend, only to regret it later on and also have her negligence basically lead to her friend’s death), but it was later subverted when she just ended up back with that same boyfriend at the end of the season. This supposed message was undermined even more in Season 2, when she hooks up with another character, apparently without any consequences or regrets at all.

But all in all, Season 1 was a fantastic intro to a fantastic show, complete with all the scares, tears, and feels you could wish for. I finished it still wanting more, and, thank goodness, there was a whole new season just waiting for me to dive in…


Season 2: A new challenger approaches…

It’s been a year since we last saw our friends in Hawkins. Season 2 starts off on Halloween of 1984, catching us up on all the small town happenings and introducing a few new characters, including a brother and sister from sunny California who instantly become the coolest, most envied kids in town, and Joyce’s new boyfriend, Bob (played by Sean Astin). Will is no longer missing, but he’s still feeling the aftereffects of his journey into the Upside Down, which include terrifying  visions of a great shadow monster that fills the whole sky. Meanwhile, a strange blight is spreading across Hawkins, attacking crops with rot and slowly transforming the landscape into the likeness of the Upside Down. Hopper, who has been hiding Eleven in a house in the woods for the past year, is called out to investigate the blight, and Eleven endeavors to escape her quarters and find her mother and her past. Hawkins must once again face the darkness from the Upside Down, and, with Eleven’s help, hopefully defeat it.

Season 2 really ramps up the threat posed by the Upside Down, broadening the scope of the show for a much more epic, cinematic experience. This time, our heroes face an intelligent evil instead of a mindless monster, an villain easily capable of destroying all of Hawkins, and maybe the entire world. I really enjoyed this broadening of horizons, and I honestly liked Season 2 even more than Season 1. It almost made the first season feel small in comparison, as characters venture outside of Hawkins and a new set of friends and threats are introduced. The writers once again managed to craft an extraordinarily tightly-woven storyline out of a massive cast of characters, and still made sure that every character had their own distinct personality and backstory. I really enjoyed how they allowed different characters to take the spotlight in Season 2; where as Season 1 was more focused on Mike, this time around it’s really Will’s story, with Steve and Dustin and a few other characters playing much bigger roles. The creators of the show are not afraid to mix things up, while still retaining all the awesome aspects of Season 1 that made the show good in the first place, and Season 2 more than lived up to all the hype. I can hardly wait to see what happens next!


Final Rating: 4 out of 5 stars

“The hype is real! And, surprisingly, quite justified this time.”


Content note: Stranger Things is rated TV-14, and not without reason. There is a lot of language, some violence and scary images, and, as I said before, a character who hooks up with two different boys. Although the show stars several young actors, it’s definitely not a kids’ show, and I would personally say it would be better for older teens.


Thanks for reading my review of Stranger Things! Do you like the show? Which do you like better: Season 1 or Season 2? What are some of your favorite characters? Let’s chat in the comments!

🙂

Who We Are (A Guest Post By Julia Vanlandingham)

Who We Are

Hey everyone! My best friend Julia wrote an amazing essay which I posted on here a few months back, and… she’s done it again! I hope you enjoy this awesome guest essay. 🙂


Who are you? It’s an easy question, right? So simple: Who are you? My answer to this question most of the time sounds something like this, “I’m Julia, I’m 17 years old. I have four sisters and one brother. I also have one brother-in-law, one sister-in-law, and one baby niece. I LOVE mathematics, but I don’t like writing. I’m not that good at writing, because I have a very mathematical brain.” That may describe some aspects of me (some incorrectly, but we’ll get to that later), but does this answer really say who I am? I think not. This description say my name, my age, and my profession (or projected profession). This describes how others perceive me on my surface, but not really truly who I am.

The things we are passionate about, the activities and people we love, the experiences we have had: these are the things that shape us. However, what does that really mean? It means that as we grow older we change. The friends we have and the environment we live in will shape how we talk and act. The activities we participate in will either spark our interest in a certain field or scorch it. The people we love will change us in many ways. Whether it be that you pick your clothes up off the floor for them, or you mow the lawn everyday for them, it is a deviation from your normal behavior. So, people and events shape us, but is that what defines our identity? Are we simply the sum of all our actions?

Oftentimes we describe who we are based on what we do or what other people have told us we are. As an example, my whole life I have been told I was a bad writer. Now, let’s get something straight, at one point in time I was very bad at writing, but I worked hard and I have changed that. So, I always thought of myself as a bad writer. I thought that was one of the things that defined who I was. The longer I was told this, the more and more it was engrained in my mind that was me: Julia, the mathematician who can’t write.

I think that, in this case, the sum of all the parts is so much less than the whole. So, what is missing, what makes us a whole and not simply a sum of actions? Well, the answer is simple, but also so very hard to see at times: God. The missing factor is the Lord. This is what makes us who we are really, this is what defines us. First and foremost we are a child of the King. So, as I describe myself the biggest and most important part of who I am is not that I am a mathematician or that I have a big family, or that I once was not good a writing. It is that I have been saved by the precious blood of Jesus Christ. I have lived, died and been risen with him, and that is what makes me who I am.

So, we are not simply defined as what we do or who we know, there is so much more to each and every one of us. Oftentimes we do not take the time to get to know people deeply, to really get to know who they are. This leads us to see them as the sum of their actions. Often this can lead to misconceptions about people, and sometimes it can hurt that person deeply for a long time. When someone is told repeatedly that a certain characteristic defines them, they will eventually begin to believe it. They will start to tell themselves the same thing, and they may believe that is who they are. Once someone has told themselves that this thing defines them for long enough, it is hard to go back. It leaves a scar. One that most people can’t even see. One that maybe the person can’t even see themselves. It takes a long time and much help to see that this doesn’t define them.

So, whatever it is that you have been told defines you. Whatever you have told yourself defines you. Whatever you think you are bad at and that you just can not do that thing and it is going to hold you back. Forget it. That is not you. Do not let anyone else tell you who you are. Strive everyday to live your identity in Christ, the only thing that can never be taken from you.


I hope you enjoyed this amazing guest post! What are some ways we could learn to shape our identities in Christ? Let’s chat in the comments!

See you again soon. 🙂

The Writer’s Tag

Welp. I was supposed to do this post yesterday, but, obviously, I completely forgot, so I’m going to do it today! I was tagged a couple days ago by Susannah @ Tea with Tumness for the Writer’s Tag (not to be confused with the Writer’s Book Tag, which I was also tagged for on the same day…) So, without further ado, let’s jump into the questions, shall we?


Writer's Tag


1. What was the first story you remember writing?

When I was very, very little, I would tear out enormous sheets of sketch paper and tape them together into ‘books’. These ‘books’ were usually Super Mario of Legend of Zelda fanfiction, filled with lots of colorful (badly drawn) pictures and poorly-spelled stories. These are the very first stories I remember writing, and I still have them… somewhere.

2. Where do you gain your inspiration? 

Often when I read a new exciting book or watch a cool movie, I’ll feel really inspired to create something new. I also enjoy listening to music and making aesthetic playlists that help inspire new aspects of a story.

3. Who/What exactly encouraged you to become a writer?

When I was in elementary school my mom read me a book called The School Story by Andrew Clements, which is about a girl who publishes a book when she’s only twelve. I was super inspired by the story, and it encouraged me to try writing my own books in the hope that one day I would be published too!

4. If you had a choice between past or present tense to use, which one would you pick?

I’ve experimented a fair amount with present tense, and while I like it and enjoy writing in it, I still think I prefer past tense, at least to some extent. Present tense seems  to give the story a more modern or fast-paced feel, which is good for some stories, but past tense gives the story a slightly slower, more familiar feel, and also make it way easier to write with multiple points of view.

5. Do you have some type of “kryptonite” weakness?

I spend far too much time browsing Twitter or Instagram or doing literally anything other than writing. I honestly tend to procrastinate way too much. I also can’t write when there are people around.

6. On the flip side, do you have a type of “superman” strength?

I write best in the evenings, or during thunderstorms. The weather seems to have something to do with my moods, at least when it comes to writing.

7. Are there any guilty pleasures of yours?

I love watching YouTube videos! Recently, I’ve been watching a lot of a very science-oriented channel called Vsauce, where they talk about everything from physics to the concept of infinity to whether or not cereal can be considered a soup, all in a super engaging way. Among my other favorite channels are The Game Theorists, The Film Theorists, React, and Rosanna Pansino.

8. Is there a genre of media/entertainment you’ve not seen but want to try out one day?

I am very interested in modern (freestyle/free verse) poetry, but I haven’t really read much of it except a few pieces here and there online. I’ve asked my family to get me a copy of Smoke Signals by Ashley Dun for Christmas, which looks to be a very good collection of beautiful poetry, and I can’t wait to give it a read!

9. And finally, what is your favorite writing snack?

I don’t really have a go-to writing snack, or usually eat while writing, but I did munch on some tasty corn chips while writing this post, so I guess those will have to do. 😉

10. So, would you do more Q&A’s like this?

Yes! I love doing Q&A’s, be they interviews on other people’s blogs, tags like these, or Paper Fury’s Beautiful People Meme!


Now, it’s time to tag some bloggers! I tag…


I hope you enjoyed this post! I promise, this should be the last tag I’m doing for at least a little while… unless I get tagged again. 😛

See you again soon!

The Writer’s Book Tag

Hey, everyone. I’ve never been tagged by anyone before, but over the last two days I was actually tagged twice by two different people for two separate blog tags! Confusing? Yes. Awesome? Of course! I’ll be doing the first tag, the Writer’s Book Tag, today, and then the second tag on Thursday. Thank you so much to Jenn @ The Book Nook for tagging me! Here goes…


writertaglogo1


First Draft

A book or series that you’ve never read before.

I have several books on my shelf by authors that I like, but which I haven’t yet found time to read. Most notably, Guardians of the West by David Eddings, has been sitting there for several months now, unopened. I love-love-loved Eddings’ Belgariad series (it is yet another entry on the ever growing list of books and series that I need to reread but don’t have time to reread), but I haven’t yet found time to crack open this first book of the Malloreon.


Second Draft

A book or series you didn’t like as much the second time you read it.

Sue me, but I’m going to have to say the Harry Potter books on this one. I was obsessed with them the first time through, but later rereadings haven’t been kind to this series. I own all the books, including the companion Hogwarts Library set, but I haven’t touched them in a couple of years.


Final Draft

A book or series that you’ve liked for a really long time.

There are a ton of books that I’ve loved since I was little, but I don’t think any of them have made such a big impact on me as The School Story by Andrew Clements. It tells the story of a twelve year old girl who publishes her own book, and it really inspired me to become a writer myself, and dream big even at a young age.


Killing Off Your Characters

A book or series that made you cry.

This is a bit difficult, because I don’t usually physically cry about books, and I can’t clearly remember any times that I actually have. One book that did make me really sad, though, was Fairest by Marissa Meyer. It tells the story of the villain of her Lunar Chronicles series from the perspective of said villain, and the story and writing were honestly super heart wrenching and very, very sad.


Plot Holes

A book or series that disappointed you.

I really, really, really wanted to like Six of Crows by Leigh Bardugo, but it was so dark and problematic and very immoral, and all the fantastic, spellbinding writing in the world couldn’t rescue it for me.

I was also very disappointed by the end of A Series of Unfortunate EventsAfter building up and sustaining and exciting mystery over thirteen books, the ending fell flat and failed to explain much of anything.


Writer’s Block

A book or series you never finished.

Once again, two series come to mind. I started reading Throne of Glass by Sarah J. Maas, just to see what all the hype was about. The first book was not at all impressive, with poorly constructed dialogue and undeveloped writing skills, and although the second book was more interesting, I dropped it after I heard that the later books contained R-rated content. Not worth my time, especially if I can’t even finish reading the story because of the content.

I also never finished The Inheritance Cycle by Christopher Paolini. The first book, Eragon, was okay, but I had to force myself to finish the massive second book, Eldest, because it was so boring, and the third book was even worse, so I dropped it after about five chapters worth of overly flowery description and unexciting action.


Feedback

A book or series you’d recommend to anyone and everyone.

There are literally so many answers I could put here, but I’ll try to narrow it down to just a few…

First of all, I always recommend the Evenmere Chronicles to everyone. It’s not very well known, but the writing and characters are amazing and it’s a very fresh take on a genre (epic fantasy) that seems to have been done to death in recent years.

I also never hesitate to recommend any and all of N. D. Wilson’s books. His novels are, of course, fantastic (I own well-loved copies of all of them, except Leepike Ridgehis first book, which for some reason I never seem to have gotten hold of), and his two non-fiction books, Notes from the Tilt-A-Whirl and Death by Living are also amazing takes on the Christian faith. 10/10 would recommend everything N. D. Wilson.


That’s it for my answers! Today, I’ll be tagging three awesome bloggers to join in the fun:


Thanks for reading today! I hope you enjoyed all my answers, and that you check out a couple of those books I recommended back there *wink, wink, nudge, nudge*. Also don’t forget to check out Katie @ The Act Diary, who created this tag.

See you again soon!

🙂

The Tangle Blog Tour: Recap

Last week was super exciting, because it was the week of The Tangle Blog Tour! I did several awesome interviews with some of my favorite bloggers, and more. Check it all out below:

Blog Tour Day 1: Indie Author Interview with Kyle Robert Shultz

Blog Tour Day 2: Book Review by S. M. Metzler

Blog Tour Day 3: Video Interview with Hannah Heath

Blog Tour Day 4: Interview with Brianna Merritt


Extras:

Check out Hannah Heath’s awesome review of The Tangle over on Constant Collectible

My favorite bookstagrammer, theshybooks, posted an awesome picture of her copy of The Tangle


I hope you enjoy all this awesome content! I was so excited to partner with these other bloggers and authors to help promote The Tangle. It’s been a ton of fun.

See you again soon!

🙂


 

Movie Review: Thor Ragnarok

thor

A refreshing, humorous flick to break up a long line of darker films.


As you know, I can never resist a Marvel movie, and I’ve been pretty hyped up for this one for a while now. Loki is pretty much my favorite Marvel character, and I was excited for the film to further explore Asgard and the Nine Realms.

Make no mistake: This film is really good. The humor is on point, the visuals are stunning, and the acting and plot are enough to keep you interested even after you’ve run out of popcorn, but… I’m honestly beginning to question whether or not I’m getting a little… tired of Marvel movies. Even if that’s the case, it doesn’t mean I’ll stop watching them. These films are fantastic entertainment, and many even have hidden depths and messages to ponder and explore. But after 17 films (17 films?? Really? It honestly feels like more…) I’m wondering whether or not all the hype is really worth it. I can’t wait to see Infinity War, but I’ll also be glad when it’s over and all the loose ends are (hopefully) tied up. (Hahahahaha. Of course you know they won’t be. The MCU makes way, way too much money for it to ever really die.)

But enough chit-chat. Let’s talk about the film itself.

The first thing that really jumps out about Thor: Ragnarok is it’s humor. After a long line of serious Marvel films that dealt with some fairly real issues alongside their explosive action (Avengers: Age of UltronCaptain America: Civil War, etc.), this film feels more like a kind of slapstick, comedic fantasy romp than anything else. Filled with visually stunning landscapes, spaceships, epic battles, and hilarious one-liners, it is a very new, fresh take on Thor that I didn’t really expect. Everything from the colorful, eye-catching poster to the goofy title font to Thor’s new hairstyle bill this film as a completely different, more comedic spin on these normally serious Marvel characters, and I honestly really enjoyed it.

While the film does dole out some important story points and lore for the larger Marvel Cinematic Universe, it is nicely self-contained and adventurous enough to introduce a whole cast of new characters to play off of our old heroes; Thor, Loki, and the Hulk. The pacing is good, and the film doesn’t get bogged down in backstory, even though it introduces a massive new player, the villain Hela (fantastically played by Cate Blanchett), who of course comes with her own tragic past and motivations. Unlike the villain of the previous Thor film (whose name I can’t even remember, he was that forgettable) Hela carries a real threat and her presence had me questioning whether or not all the heroes would actually survive. I love that the writers weren’t afraid to raise the stakes by completely and irreversibly destroying Thor’s hammer, his greatest weapon, putting it out of play in the MCU forever. It felt like a very bold move, and definitely added weight to Hela’s threat against the heroes.

All in all, this film was fun, visually stunning, and a considerably lighter take on Thor and his friends that I really enjoyed. Am I going to watch it again as soon as it comes out? I don’t know. To be honest, probably not. But I can say that I can’t wait until this quest for the Infinity Stones is finally over.


Final Rating: 4.5 out of 5 stars

“Refreshing. Funny. But it doesn’t change the fact that we’ve sat through 17 movies at this point.”


I hope you enjoyed my review of Thor: Ragnarok! I’ll see you again soon.

🙂

Wednesday with Words: I Drove Home

Hey, everyone! Wednesday with Words if finally back. Today I have a very special quote from one of my favorite bloggers, Aimee Meester. She wrote an amazing poem called “I Drove Home” and put it on her blog a couple of months ago. I’ve really wanted to share it with you for a while now, and I guess there’s no time like the present! Make sure you check out the full poem on Aimee’s blog.

I Drove Home