Blogger Shout Out! (My Top 5 Favorite Blogs of 2017)

2017, so far, has been a pretty great year. Besides completing multiple writing projects (yasss!), learning to play guitar (or starting to learn, anyway), and becoming a Whovian, I’ve really enjoyed getting more involved in the blogging community and meeting a lot of new blogger friends online. So, today I thought I’d give a shout out to my top five favorite blogs, so that you can go check them out and find some cool new blogs to read!

Here we go:


5. Feels Like Hope

Feels Like Hope is the brilliant, excruciatingly honest blog of Aimee Meester, writer and creator of the amazing The Bright Eyes Project sci-fi podcast, which I’ve been listening to and enjoying greatly. The blog is fairly new, but already it is shaping up to be fantastic, and I really love Aimee’s writing style. Her posts are also absolutely brilliant and she has some great advice for writers.

Visit Feels Like Hope

Say hi to Aimee on Twitter

Check out The Bright Eyes Project


4. The Invisible Moth

The blog of Christian author Daley Downing, where she blogs about reading, writing, spiritual growth, and more. One of my favorite posts by her is Some Writing Tips I Take Issue With, in which she talks about some bad writing tips that often circulate in the Christian writing community. You should definitely check out this post, and Daley’s whole blog!

Visit The Invisible Moth

Say hi to Daley on Twitter


3. Hannah Heath’s Blog

Another awesome Christian author with lots of brilliant writing advice. She has a new post every Friday, and I always love getting updates from her blog in my inbox. Check out this awesome post, where she looks at and explains the age-old adage “Write what you know”.

Visit Hannah’s Blog

Say hi to Hannah on Twitter


2. Tea with Tumness

Tea with Tumness is the blog of S. M. Metzler, a YA fantasy author. She has tons of brilliant posts about writing, and also wrote a hilarious Sherlock fanfiction called ‘A Visit to the Psychologist’. Her writing advice is always spot on and super smart, and I highly recommend you check out her blog.

Visit Tea with Tumness

Say hi to Ms. Metzler on Twitter

Check out ‘A Visit to the Psychologist’


1. Paper Fury

If you’ve been following my blog for a while, you’ve probably read some of my flailings over Cait A.K.A Paper Fury, who is probably one of my favorite bloggers of all time! She is an absolutely hilarious and lovely book blogger, with one of the most gorgeous blogs and Instagram feeds I have ever seen. She posts book reviews, blogging and writing advice, and also hosts the Beautiful People meme, which I have participated in for the past couple of months. Definitely check out her blog because it is awesome.

Visit Paper Fury

Say hi to Cait on Twitter

Check out the Beautiful People meme


Thanks for reading this post! I hope you enjoyed it. Are there any bloggers on this list that you really like? Do you have any other favorite bloggers? Let me know in the comments!

🙂


Blogger Shout Out

Challenging Ourselves: Why Writing Needs to Be Difficult

Here’s something that should be said more often: Writing is really, really difficult. From the outside, it looks deceivingly simple. You open up a Microsoft Word document, bang out somewhere around 40,000 words, and suddenly you have a novel. What could be easier? Why are those authors over there whining about the pitfalls of editing and the horror that is first drafts? What do they have to complain about? Writing is easy!

I used to think like that. I used to think that if it wasn’t easy for me, than I must be doing something wrong. I must not be a good enough writer. I’m procrastinating too much. My sentences are incoherent. Most the time, I fail to have an actual plot until I’m about half way through the first draft. I must not have had enough practice. I am not worthy to call myself ‘author’ unless I can write a new book every three months and have it be completely fabulous the first time around.

Here’s the thing, though: none of that is true. Writing is not easy. We don’t write because it’s easy. We don’t write so that, someday, it can be easy. We write because we have to, because it challenges us, because we are called to write. We write for the same reason that musicians make music and painters paint.

This might not sound super relevant, but stick with me for a moment: I work at a gym, a jungle gym, where kids come to learn parkour and gymnastics. Before I got a job there, I took classes. My teacher, now my boss, had a few things to say to us students about challenging ourselves. I am greatly paraphrasing, but, “If you’re doing something and it’s easy, then you’re not learning anything,” he told us, “Pick something difficult, something that you can’t do, and do that until it’s easy. Then pick the next difficult thing.”

So when we write, and it seems impossible to get it just right even on the third or fourth of fifth draft, let’s not complain (not too much, anyway). In that moment, you are learning something entirely new. You are learning the ten thousand ways that don’t work in order to find the way that does. You are mastering something difficult. You are improving your writing, even if in the moment it looks like absolute rubbish. Writing is not easy. It’s not supposed to be. If we wanted to do something easy, we would be shuffling papers in an office somewhere. Writing has to be difficult so that we can learn to write better.


Thank you so much for reading! I hope you enjoyed this post. What do you think? What are some things you find difficult, or some difficult things you’ve mastered or learned from in the past? Let me know in the comments.

🙂


Challenging Ourselves

Wednesday with Words: Mere Connection

In addition to being on summer break, I’ve been rather sick for the last week or so, giving me plenty of time to read a few books. One of them was Reclaiming Conversation by Sherry Turkle, which we had on our shelf downstairs and which I’ve been meaning to read for a while. This book is all about conversation —deep, open-ended talks with other people that do more than just exchange information— versus today’s culture of mere connection, where we’re always on our phones and only half listening to the people around us. I found it to be very humbling and eye opening, and it has inspired me to put down my phone more often and actually do something with my time instead. I found several good quotes in the book, so I thought I’d share one with you today:

Conversation


As always, Wednesday with Words is hosted by ladydusk.

14528-www2bladydusk

Beautiful People #27 ~ August Edition

Hey, everyone! Guess what? It’s time for another Beautiful People post! This awesome meme is hosted by Cait @ Paper Fury and Sky @ Further Up and Further In. These are some of my favorite posts to do on the blog, so I hope you enjoy today’s. 🙂


What is the Beautiful People meme?

From the Beautiful People FAQ on Paper Fury:

Beautiful People is for writers. Every month, we post a list of 10 questions for you to answer about your characters. It’s designed to help you get to know your characters – their quirks, their personality, their flaws, and who they are.


DISCLAIMER: I cannot guarantee that everything here is or will be canon in the future. I have spent a fair amount of time developing these characters, but some stuff is still unclear in my own mind, so I will try to answer the questions as best I can.

Also, the character I’ll be using for today’s post is from a super-secret project that I have yet to officially announce, so some details about the characters and plot will have to remain secret, for now…

Enjoy the post!


The Character

chalis007-189517

Mae Ki-Nari from my super secret sci-fi project. Photo by 胡 卓亨 on Unsplash

The Question

1.What are they addicted to/can’t live without?

Mae loves listening to music. It helps her focus and drown out the crazy world around her. She also likes to have a piece of technology by her side at all times. She’d be lost without her laptop or phone!

2. Name 3 positive and 3 negative qualities about your character.

Positive: She’s smart, straightforward, and very persistent. She likes to see things through to the end.

Negative: She is very snarky and sarcastic, she doesn’t relate well to people, and she tends to completely overthink everything.

3. Are they holding onto something they should get rid of?

She’s definitely holding on to her resentment (and also her idealism) of her past life and her fear of the future.

4. If 10 is completely organized and 1 is completely messy, where do they fall on the scale?

I think Mae would probably fall somewhere in the middle, maybe somewhere around 5 or 6. She doesn’t actually try to be super organized, but she owns so little that her living space is rarely ever messy. Most of her life is online, so that’s where she spends the bulk of her time. There’s not a lot in the real world for her to mess up or disorganize.

5. What most frustrates them about the world they live in?

Mae hates surveillance. She’s lived for most of her life in a place where you can never be sure if you’re being watched or not. She wants online information to be free and uncensored, and she wants to be free herself from always looking over her shoulder to make sure no one’s watching.

6. How would they dress for a night out? How would they dress for a night in?

For a night out, Mae would probably dress up as little as possible. She doesn’t like going out anyway. Maybe she would put on a dress (if she owned one) and brush her hair a bit, but that would probably be all. Unless she was going out with that special somebody, and then she would be looking up makeup tutorials online and she might actually care about if her shoes match her outfit, and get really stressed out about how she looks.

For a night in, it would be just whatever she was wearing; probably old jean shorts and a t-shirt from the secondhand store. She literally does not care about anything most of the time. 😂

7. How many shoes do they own, and what kind?

I would hazard a guess that she owns like one pair of sneakers, and that’s it. Maybe some boots too, but even that is probably stretching it.

8. Do they have any pets? What pet do they WISH they had?

Mae has never owned a pet in her life, and she probably never will. If she had to own a pet, though, she’d probably get a cat.

9. Is there something or someone that they resent? Why and what happened?

Mae resents a lot of people. It’s hard to really explain why and what happened without spoiling some of the story, but she definitely does resent both her parents. She never really had a good childhood.

10. What’s usually in their fridge or pantry?

Soda, energy drinks, synthetic food that provides all her daily vitamin and protein needs. She’s not a fan of ‘real’ (non-processed) food.


Thanks so much for reading this month’s Beautiful People post! I hope you enjoyed it, and I can’t wait to share more of this story with you as soon as possible. Right now, I’m in the middle of rewriting a bunch of it (I just got an amazing new idea today!) but hopefully I’ll be publishing the first book sometime next year.

Be sure to check out Cait’s original post, where you’ll find links to other writers who have done this meme, as well as the list of questions and a place to link up your own Beautiful People post.

Once again, Beautiful People is hosted by the amazing Cait and Sky.

Beautiful People

July Monthly Wrap Up

Hey everyone! Apparently it is… already the end of July (what???), which means it’s time for my monthly wrap up post.


Highlights:

  • I’m done school for the year! I just completed my exams and finished up the last few books, and I am officially done… for about a month. Then, it’s back to the old routine. Oh well…
  • I organized (some) of my room! Okay, so, guys, cleaning your room or living space or whatever —just because you want to, not because you have to— is like the most de-stressing thing ever. I reorganized all my drawers and my whole desk and cabinet, and I still need to work on my closet and my window-seat, but I am super surprised at how therapeutic just reorganizing stuff can be! It’s amazing.
  • I participated again in #WIPTruthOrDare! You can find all the tweets from this month here.
  • I wrote some actual words and basically doubled the word count in my super-secret project in about ten days, which is super exciting! I just passed 20,000 words in total, which is always a big milestone for me because that’s the length of my first book Behind Her Mask was Death. I really want to tell you guys all about this project, but I can’t yet!!! *cries* You’ll just have to wait and see… Mwahahahaha! <—Obviously that is an evil laugh.

Posts from July 2017:


Looking Forward:

Once again, I’m going to be away without internet or computer this month. This time, it will be for about two weeks, so I won’t be participating in #WIPTruthOrDare over on Twitter, unfortunately. (It’s like the best hashtag game of ever!) This also means that there will probably only be a couple of posts on the blog during August as well.

I want to try to finish up the first draft of my secret project during the two weeks where I won’t be away, but that’s probably not going to happen, so my goal is to reach at least 35,000 words before the 18th of August.

Fairly important update: Some of you probably know that I’ve been serially publishing my novel The Tangle on Channillo.com. The final chapter will be going up on the 26th of August, and then the novel will be complete. However, nobody has been reading it, and at this point I’m feeling that this whole thing has been rather a waste of time.  I really love this story, and I’d like for people to be able to read it, so as soon as possible I will be taking The Tangle down off Channillo.com and publishing it myself in both paperback and ebook form. The official announcement with all the details (release date and such) should be coming sometime in September, so keep an eye out for it!


Thank’s for reading my July wrap up! Do you have any plans for August that you’re excited about? Any special projects you’re working on? Let’s chat in the comments!

🙂


July Wrap Up

Netflix Review: The Flash (Seasons 1-3)

the-flash-192898DC triumphs on the small screen.


Believe it or not, I used to hate superheroes. My dad has been a big superhero fan for ages, but whenever he would talk about the latest Captain America movie or Spiderman film, I would always roll my eyes. Finally, however, he managed to get me into Marvel with the Avengers: Earth’s Mightiest Heroes animated TV show, and from there I went on to watch the films and become the massive Marvel geek you know today.

I never thought I’d get into DC. Marvel heroes were at least slightly believable, and had developed personalities and quirks and flaws that I found extremely interesting. The DC heroes, on the other hand, looked like mere cardboard cutouts, without any personality at all.

I did watch Batman Begins (and enjoyed it thoroughly), but I thought at the time that that would be the end of my interest in DC. But then, I discovered The Flash. Or, well, my dad discovered it, and watched it, and liked it, and said I should watch it too, so I did…

First things first: his show is a geek’s dream come true! There are tons of nerdy references, a delectable ammount of science (fiction) and Cisco Ramone, who will probably forever be my geek hero.

For the sake of clarity, I will do the rest of the review season by season, so that I can say what I liked about each season, and what I didn’t enjoy so much…


Season 1: Great plot, poor acting

The plot of Season 1 is masterfully written, complete with nods to the original comics, an overarching storyline that keeps you watching, and lots of twists and turns and surprises along the way. The acting, however, was not so top notch. Except for the brilliantly acted Harrison Wells (Tom Cavanagh), who really held the show together, the acting in the first few episodes was fairly cringe-worthy at times, and a bit stiff at others. Even the show’s star, Grant Gustin, didn’t quite seem to be in his element. The acting improved drastically as the season went on, however, and this season is definitely worth watching, if only for the amazing and exciting plot.


Season 2: Great acting, iffy plot

Season 2 seemed to have the opposite problem: The acting was very good, and I felt like all the actors had begun to really know and understand and play off each other very well, but the plot was significantly weaker, nowhere near as compelling as the first season. The introduction of more time travel and parallel universes was very interesting, but the use of another speedster as the main villain felt a bit like recycling the original plot. That said, this season was still really enjoyable (i.e. don’t skip it!) and I really liked all the stuff with parallel universes.


Season 3: Great acting, great plot, great show!

In Season 3, it really felt as if The Flash has finally found it’s feet: a tense, compelling plot, great acting and character development, the introduction of some awesome new characters… it was amazing! Even though the main villain was, once again, a speedster, I felt like the way he was portrayed was fresh and different enough for the Season to hold its own. However, I’m really hoping that they find a completely different type of villain for Season 4. The cliffhanger at the end of this season is also extremely unfair and I was almost crying; that’s how good it is!


Final rating: 4 out of 5 stars

“Took them a while to really find their feet, but, then again, it’s not a BBC show, so we’ll cut them some slack.”


Content note: The show is rated as TV-PG, and it was fairly clean (not a lot of swearing or immoral references), but I would still advise some caution. At one point, a character does get very drunk, and there are also characters who are dating that living together throughout the story. It really annoys me when it is assumed that as soon as people start dating they are supposed to move in together. However, there was very little else of concern. I would say probably ages 14 and up.


Thank you for reading! I hope you enjoyed my review. Have you seen The Flash? Whose your favorite character? (Mine are Cisco and Harrison Wells). Do you like DC or Marvel, or both??? Let me know in the comments!

🙂

Wednesday With Words: A Boiling Imagination

Today, I wanted to share this lovely quote from Francis Shaeffer’s He Is There And He Is Not Silent, a book which tackles the distortion of truth and goodness in our current culture, and shows how Christianity is the only viable option that can explain our world. This particular quote is extremely encouraging to me as an author and creative person, because, sometimes, Christians get caught up in this idea that we shouldn’t be creative, because it must be wrong somehow.

Creativity


On my reading list this week:

The Blue Castle by L. M. Montgomery: Another lesser-known novel by the author of Green Gables. It was on our shelf, and I am very good at not reading the things I probably should be reading (*cough, cough* The Mysterious Benedict Society *cough, cough*) so I thought I’d try it out. I’m only a chapter in, but it already promises to be very interesting.


As always, Wednesdays With Words is hosted by ladydusk.

14528-www2bladydusk

Unpopular Opinions: The Thirteenth Doctor

On Sunday, the 16th of July, 2017, the BBC announced their pick for the new Doctor on Doctor Who. One of the longest running sci-fi shows in history, Doctor Who has been broadcasted for over 50 years. In all those years the main character of the series, the Doctor — a time-traveling, double-hearted, slightly mad alien Time Lord from the planet Gallifrey, who can regenerate into a new body whenever he is about to die— has always been portrayed as male. Whether sporting a bow tie or a trench-coat, a multicolored scarf or a fez, whether carrying a celery stalk or a supply of jelly babies, the Doctor has always, always regenerated into a man.

Not so now.

Actress Jodie Whittaker was just announced as the new star of Doctor Who. She will be taking over the role from Peter Capaldi, the Twelth Doctor. “I want to tell the fans not to be scared by my gender,” she says, “Because this is a really exciting time and Doctor Who represents everything that’s exciting about change. This is only a new, different one, not a fearful one.”


I was honestly not quite sure what to think when I heard that a woman would be taking over as the Doctor. On the one hand, according to show canon, a Time Lord can technically regenerate into a person of the opposite gender. At the moment, the world is charged with massive conversations about diversity and equality and feminism and equal representation in the media. This would appear to be the perfect answer to that conversation: the introduction of a woman into a role that has always been played by men. At least, many people would say so.

I have nothing against diversity, as far as it goes (i.e. not making every character in your story white and male). But there is something about this contemporary thrust for ‘diversity’ in the media that feels extraordinarily off. As a writer myself, a creator of characters, I have come to understand that if you force a character to be something that they are not, it can wreck the entire story. Trying to force two characters into a romantic relationship; trying to force a character to feel happy in a situation where they would, in fact, be resentful; trying to force a male character to be female, and vise versa… these things will never work as well as leaving the character alone to be who they are in the first place.

Characters are funny creatures. The best of them are like people, fully formed personalities that you uncover bit by bit, like getting to know somebody in real life. When you force them to be something they are not, you destroy that illusion of reality. You have hijacked a character, a story even, for your own purposes. Stories evolve and grow and change naturally as you write and discover what exactly they are about. They are not meant to be manipulated into saying something else.

The BBC’s decision to cast a woman as the Doctor feels, to me anyway, like forced diversity, the manipulation of a story into conveying a message. Don’t get me wrong. I’m not against women having leading roles in television or movies. I don’t think women should be disrespected, or paid less than men for doing the same amount of work, or forced to prove themselves to be just as good as men, because somehow that is a measuring stick for this sort of thing. But there is no one size fits all technique when it comes to diversity. Doctor Who may play by a very esoteric set of rules, but the show’s own lore is fairly contradictory on the point of sex-changing regeneration, and there are a few other objections I can raise to the casting of a female Doctor.

But lets take a step back for a second and really look at this show. It’s not as if Doctor Who isn’t diverse or doesn’t portray strong female characters. Some people seem to forget that the Doctor’s female companions, at least in the reboot, aren’t poor, damsel-in-distress types. Martha and Donna are probably some of the strongest characters in the show. Rose, even though she gets a lot of flack for some reason or other, is creative and brilliant and so, so strong in times of hopelessness. Some people also seem to forget that the female companions of the Doctor are not always there to be love interests. Some people forget that the Doctor had rich platonic relationships with not only Martha, but Donna, Amy, and Clara as well; four out of the five female companions in the reboot (I can’t yet count Bill, as I haven’t seen any of her episodes, but I gather that she isn’t a love interest either.)

Are we out to destroy all shows and books and films with male leads? Have men suddenly become evil, or alien; nonhuman? Look me in the face and tell me that this outlook, rampant in our culture even if not expressed in so many words, is not sexist. Sexism can go both ways, and right now many people are extremely angry at men for being men. Isn’t that exactly what they accuse men of being; angry at women for being women? Aren’t we being slightly hypocritical here?

The dynamic of the Doctor — the mad man in the blue box— and his companions, both male and female, platonic and romantic, his friends and his family, his wife (don’t you forget River), his relationships with the people he meets on his journeys… you could say that it is these dynamics that make the show itself. And this is where I say something that many of you will not like: men and women are different. They are treated differently, because in some situations they have different roles. They act differently. We like to plaster over these differences in the name of ‘equality’, but all it does is cause confusion. But gender, whether we like it or not, is intrinsically tied to personality, to who we are as people, to what we do and how we act. Women will always act in certain ways, see the world in certain ways, be different people than men.

And by changing the Doctor into a woman, the BBC will have changed him into a different person entirely.

Character relationships will break down. Certain dynamics will no longer be possible. The Doctor will be a completely different character. No writer can change that. Or they might try to force it, and run the risk of ruining things entirely. The show will change, and probably not for the better. Change is often good. Variety is the spice of life. But you cannot change the way the world works, no matter how much you try, and I would hazard a small speculation that this change will not do the world longest running sci-fi show any good. In fact, it may doom Doctor Who in the end. The writers will end up trying to push a message so prominent in our culture today: that no one is bound by truth, that you can be absolutely anyone, literally, regardless of gender. And, unfortunately, this message is just not true.


Philosophical arguments aside (for the most part), the show’s own lore seems to contradict itself on several points when it comes to sex-changing regeneration. Please note that there will be some spoilers ahead for River Song’s story arc, so if you haven’t watched this part of the show yet, please proceed with caution!

Spoilers

When a Time Lord is about to die, they instead regenerate into an entirely new body. This is why there are currently thirteen different ‘versions’ of the Doctor (not counting the War Doctor from the 50th anniversary special), each played by a different actor. Although the Doctor says several times that Time Lords can regenerate into people of the opposite gender, there are also very clear differences between male and female Time Lords. One major difference is that female Time Lords (or is that Time Ladies?) can actually control aspects of how they look when they regenerate. Male Time Lords cannot. This is established both by the Doctor (who complains after various regenerations about the size of his ears, his ‘new teeth’, and, most often, that he’s not a redhead) and the female Time Lord River Song, who can concentrate on a dress size or other feature during regeneration and achieve it in her next form.

For there to be specific differences between male and female Time Lords, there would first have to be such a thing as male and female Time Lords. If you were born male, you would not be able to predict or control the physical characteristics of your regeneration. If you were born female, you could. You might still regenerate into someone of a different height or weight or ethnicity, but these are all physical characteristics. And although the current culture would have us believe otherwise, gender is much, much more than physical characteristics.

So, these two things are not logically consistent. If male and female Time Lords have different traits that set them apart, how can a male Time Lord regenerate into a female one? Has he suddenly crossed over that boundary? Can he suddenly control his regeneration? And the reverse is just as confusing. If a female Time Lord regenerates into a male, does she suddenly lose her ability to control her regeneration? Can she concentrate on becoming male in the first place, or is that just random like it seems to be for a male Time Lord?

I would love to see a black or Asian Doctor, or a Doctor of any ethnicity. In fact, it would be an amazing opportunity for actors of different cultural background to bring something new to the show. But a female Doctor, especially at this particular moment, just feels far too much like a blatantly political decision, not a decision which retains the integrity of the show itself. It might even contradict show canon. And any piece of art, be it a novel or a show or a film, should never be made to force a political opinion. That defeats the purpose.

All of this goes to say that I am not thrilled about the new Doctor. But I think I’ll give her a chance. Who knows? Maybe something amazing will happen. I have only one request: that instead of turning this into an opportunity to rant and hate on men or women, we instead judge the character not by their gender or ethnicity, but by their portrayal. Women should not be inserted into the media just because they are women. They should be portrayed because they are people, and a legitimate part of humanity. If the writers of Doctor Who can do that with a female Doctor, and not lose sight of the original message of the show itself, then they will have won.



Thanks for reading this unpopular opinion! What are your thoughts about the new Doctor? Are you excited, or nervous? Do you think that Jodie Whittaker is a good choice for a female Doctor? Let’s talk in the comments below.

See you again next time!

🙂


The Thirteenth Doctor Edited

Movie Review: Cars 3

Cars 3Sweet, but lacking the heart of its predecessor.


I never actually meant to see this movie. I expected it to be rather awful, considering the bizarre mess that was Cars 2. (Interestingly enough, I originally enjoyed Cars 2 back when I first saw it, but I was a small, deluded child at the time, so… never mind.) But then Cars 3 turned out to be playing in our local theater, and my dad decided to take me and my brothers on a Saturday afternoon.

I had actually seen several of my Twitter friends saying that this movie was (surprisingly) good, so I was pleasantly surprised and pleased to find out that they were right! Unfortunately, while being enjoyable and sweet, the plot of Cars 3 is a little predictable, and I just found it lacking in the emotional connection of the first Cars film. I really feel that if Pixar had just concentrated their energies on making this movie instead of the crazy second Cars, it might have turned out even better. As it stands, this movie is fun, but rather forgettable in the end, and, ultimately, just one more sequel in a long line of sequels that don’t quite live up to the original.


Final rating: 3.5 out of 5 stars

“I think it’s sequel fatigue, unfortunately. Nice, but forgettable.”


Thank you for reading my little review. See you next time!

🙂

Beautiful People #26 ~ Author Writing Process

Hey everyone! Today I’ll be doing another Beautiful People post. This awesome meme is hosted by Cait @ Paper Fury and Sky @ Further Up and Further In. I’ve had so much fun doing these posts over the last two months, and this month’s theme is pretty awesome, so I thought I’d continue…


WHAT IS THE BEAUTIFUL PEOPLE MEME?

From the Beautiful People FAQ on Paper Fury:

Beautiful People is for writers. Every month, we post a list of 10 questions for you to answer about your characters. It’s designed to help you get to know your characters – their quirks, their personality, their flaws, and who they are.

This month, the theme is a little bit different. It’s Camp NaNoWriMo Month, and although I’m not directly participating in the camp, I really wanted to join in this month’s meme. It’s all about an author’s writing process, which I haven’t really talked about much on this blog, so… here we go!


The Questions:

1. How do you decide which project to work on?

Hm… I don’t know. It kind of just happens. For a while, I would have about ten million projects happening at basically the same time, but then I discovered that if I just choose one and stick to it, the likelihood of me actually finishing anything increases by somewhere around 100%. So, I kind of just pick the thing I’d like to finish up first, and then chip away at it.

2.How long does it usually take you to finish a project?

It varies, like, a lot. For example, I wrote the first draft of my first book in less than two months, and then spent an excruciatingly long time editing it (about nine months, or more). I wrote the first draft of my second book in somewhere around three months. My latest project took me six months to complete the first draft, and that was only because I squeezed the last 30,000 words of work into just under one month. There will probably also be tons of editing for that project as well, so, yeah… *stress intensifies*

3.Do you have any routines to put you in the writing mood?

It depends. Some days, I listen to music. Sometimes I just want to write in silence. It really just depends on the day. Sometimes I listen to whole albums straight through while I write, and sometimes it’s just one song on repeat.

4.What time of day do you write best?

At night. Right before I’m supposed to go to bed. No, seriously. This is a legitimate problem that I have. I always get tons of inspiration (and time) to write at around nine in the evening, which is bad because if I don’t turn off all my screens at least a half-hour before I sleep, I don’t sleep very well at all (and I don’t sleep well anyway), and I write on a computer, so yeah.

#authorfail

Also, completely random bursts of inspiration in the middle of the night are really, really annoying. 😅

5.Are there any authors you think you have a similar style to?

A person (my dad) has actually compared my style to “something like a cross between Terry Pratchett and N. D. Wilson”. I think for some things, I would probably have to agree to this comparison (like description and sometimes dialogue) but for other things… I don’t know.

6.Why did you start writing, and why do you keep writing?

I started writing because I had stories to tell (mostly Super Mario Bros. fanfiction, at least at first). I keep writing because it’s just what I do. I can’t imagine not writing.

7.What’s the hardest thing you’ve written?

hate writing romance. But I like shipping characters, both my own and other peoples’ (The Doctor and River Song! I will go down with this ship!!!!). And my characters apparently like being shipped with each other, so… yeah. It makes it pretty hard for me sometimes. Unrelated, but I also had a very tough time with the climax chapter of Behind Her Mask was Death. I had to totally rewrite it from scratch so that it wasn’t awful.

8.Is there a project you want to tackle someday but you don’t feel ready yet?

Lots. There are lots of projects like this. One that comes to mind is my Middle Grade urban fantasy trilogy, with a magical house and maybe some time-travel and wizards and stuff. I also have an idea for a stand-alone contemporary graphic novel, a nonfiction book about videogames (what even), and a paranormal novel about a haunted library. And a lot of other things. I will never, ever run out of projects to not work on.

9.What writing goals did you make for 2017 and how are they going?

I’m currently working on a sci-fi duology. I’ve finished the first draft of the first book, and I’m working on the second book now. I want to have the first book ready for publication by mid-2018, and the second book done for 2019. So, very long-term goals. But they’re going okay. I actually finished the first draft! You have no idea how rare that is for me.

10.Describe your writing process in 3 words or a gif!

Write, procrastinate, repeat.

Or, to use a GIF:

smash the keyboard

*authorish flailing intensifies*

(Small note: That is the first ever GIF I’ve used on this blog. What??? The internet must be getting to me…)


Thanks so much for reading this post! I hope you enjoyed it. Be sure to check out Cait’s original post, where you’ll find links to other writers who have done this meme, as well as the list of questions and a place to link up your own Beautiful People post.

Once again, Beautiful People is hosted by the amazing Cait and Sky.

Beautiful People